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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
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Results 41 - 60 of 165.


Environment - Materials Science - 29.01.2021
Climate-Relevant Exchange Processes between Atmosphere and Ocean
Climate-Relevant Exchange Processes between Atmosphere and Ocean
Environmental physicist Bernd Jähne from Heidelberg University is pursuing a new approach to exploring the processes that ensue with the exchange of climatically relevant gases and volatiles between the atmosphere and the ocean. To this end, the scientist will use two imaging measurement procedures for experiments in the Heidelberg Aelotron, a wind-wave tank.

Environment - 29.01.2021
How is human behaviour impacting wildlife movement?
How is human behaviour impacting wildlife movement?
Research team with Göttingen University calls for -anthropogenic resistance- to be considered in conservation and sustainability planning For species to survive in the wild, maintaining connectivity between populations is critical. Without -wildlife corridors-, groups of animals are isolated, unable to breed and may die out.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 29.01.2021
Comparative Study on Lithium-ion Battery Series Manufacturing and Alternative Technologies
Comparative Study on Lithium-ion Battery Series Manufacturing and Alternative Technologies
Research on manufacturing battery cells is gaining momentum - and there is a strong need, considering the future demand for energy storage: For the year 2030, global production of rechargeable batteries will double from today's 750 gigawatt hours (GWh) per year to 1,500 GWh. A recently published review article in the magazine "Nature Energy" on cell production of various battery types suggests that the currently established lithium-ion batteries (LIB) dominate the market of rechargeable high-energy batteries in the coming years.

Chemistry - Environment - 29.01.2021
Synthesizing valuable chemicals from contaminated soil
Researchers of Mainz University use electrolysis to produce dichloro and dibromo compounds in a safer and more environmentally friendly manner / Results published in Science 29 January 2021 Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and ETH Zurich have developed a process to produce commodity chemicals in a much less hazardous way than was previously possible.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.01.2021
When hyperactive proteins trigger illnesses
When hyperactive proteins trigger illnesses
Researchers find trigger for autoimmune diseases and cancer of the lymph node Autoimmune diseases, in which the body's own immune system attacks healthy tissue, can be life-threatening and can impact all organs. A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now found a possible cause for these self-destructive immune system attacks: a hyperactive RANK protein on the surface of B cells.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.01.2021
New promising target for diabetes treatment
Blocking the receptor "inceptor" could protect insulin-producing beta cells One hundred years after the discovery of insulin and fifty years after that of the insulin receptor, researchers have now discovered a novel - and druggable - insulin inhibitory receptor, named inceptor. This could open up new possibilities for the treatment of diabetes: The blocking of inceptor function leads to an increased sensitisation of the insulin signaling pathway in pancreatic beta cells.

Environment - 27.01.2021
How do human behaviors impact wildlife movements?
How do human behaviors impact wildlife movements?
Researchers call for incorporation of human behaviors in conservation planning to ensure sustainable landscapes for wildlife and people. In a Perspective piece published today in One Earth journal, an international team including Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin researchers Arash Ghoddousi and Tobias Kuemmerle introduce the term 'anthropogenic resistance' to better recognize and estimate the impacts of human behaviors on wildlife movements.

Earth Sciences - Materials Science - 26.01.2021
Geologic history written in garnet sand
Geologic history written in garnet sand
Research team with participation from Göttingen University use secrets trapped in grains of sand to reveal rock journey and formation On a remote island in Papua New Guinea, an international research team including the University of Göttingen has made an important geological discovery from a garnet-rich sand.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.01.2021
Immune cells attack synapses
Immune cells attack synapses
Inflammation causes cerebral cortex dysfunction in multiple sclerosis Damage to the brain gray matter plays an important role in the progression of multiple sclerosis. A team of neuroscientists has now shown that the cause are inflammatory responses that lead to synapse loss, reducing neuronal activity.

Physics - 25.01.2021
Better bundled: new principle for generating X-rays
Better bundled: new principle for generating X-rays
Physicists from Göttingen University develop method in which beams are simultaneously generated and guided by "sandwich structure- X-rays are usually difficult to direct and guide. X-ray physicists at the University of Göttingen have developed a new method with which the X-rays can be emitted more precisely in one direction.

Physics - 24.01.2021
HZB and Humboldt University agree to set up a catalysis research laboratory
Establishment of a joint research laboratory for catalysis in the IRIS research building of HU in Adlershof Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU) have signed a cooperation agreement with the aim of establishing a joint research laboratory for catalysis in the IRIS research building of HU in Adlershof.

Physics - Materials Science - 22.01.2021
Crystal structures in super slow motion
Crystal structures in super slow motion
Physicists from Göttingen first to succeed in filming a phase transition with extremely high spatial and temporal resolution Laser beams can be used to change the properties of materials in an extremely precise way. This principle is already widely used in technologies such as rewritable DVDs. However, the underlying processes generally take place at such unimaginably fast speeds and at such a small scale that they have so far eluded direct observation.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 20.01.2021
Oldest Carbonates in the Solar System
Oldest Carbonates in the Solar System
A meteorite that fell in northern Germany in 2019 contains carbonates that are among the oldest in the solar system; it also evidences the earliest presence of liquid water on a minute planet. The high-resolution Heidelberg Ion Probe - a research instrument at the Institute of Earth Sciences at Heidelberg University - provided the measurements.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 20.01.2021
New Data about the structure of the Pyramid of Cheops
New Data about the structure of the Pyramid of Cheops
An interview with Prof. Christian Große about his pyramid research Measuring a height of 139 meters (455 ft.), the largest of the three pyramids of Giza is one of the oldest edifices in the world. Yet, even after 4,500 years, this architectural masterpiece still leaves some questions unanswered.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.01.2021
Clocking the movement of electrons inside an atom
Clocking the movement of electrons inside an atom
New technique delivers resolution improvement in ultrafast processes Ultrafast science is pursued at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). An international consortium of scientists, initiated by Reinhard Kienberger, Professor of Laser and X-ray Physics several years ago, has made significant measurements in the femtosecond range at the U.S. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC).

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 15.01.2021
How plants produce defensive toxins without harming themselves
How plants produce defensive toxins without harming themselves
Plants produce toxic substances to defend themselves against herbivores. In a new study, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena and the University of Münster were able to describe in detail the biosynthesis and exact mode of action of an important group of defensive substances, the diterpene glycosides, in wild tobacco plants.

Astronomy / Space Science - 15.01.2021
The Role of Turbulence in the Birth of Stars
The Role of Turbulence in the Birth of Stars
Computer simulations of turbulence in interstellar gas and molecular clouds - simulations so complex they were inconceivable until now - have provided important new insights into the role turbulence plays in the formation of stars. For the first time, the results of the calculations suggest how these turbulent movements transition from the supersonic to the subsonic range.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.01.2021
Digging Beneath the Surface
Researchers call for greater consideration of soil biodiversity and its ecological functions in developing international conservation strategies No 008/2021 from Jan 15, 2021 The soil is home to a quarter of all known species. In fact, life above ground wouldn't be possible without the soil and its countless inhabitants.

Life Sciences - 13.01.2021
A fly's eye view of evolution
A fly’s eye view of evolution
Research team led by Göttingen University investigates molecular basis of eye size variation in insects The fascinating compound eyes of insects consist of hundreds of individual eyes known as -facets-. In the course of evolution, an enormous variety of eye sizes and shapes has emerged, often representing adaptations to different environmental conditions.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.01.2021
Polycystic kidney disease: Study explores diet as a key factor in kidney disease
Polycystic kidney disease: Study explores diet as a key factor in kidney disease
A new clinical study at the University of Cologne and Cologne University Hospital is investigating whether a ketogenic diet has a positive effect on patients with polycystic kidney disease / The trial is funded by the American PKD Foundation (polycystic kidney disease) A team of researchers at the University of Cologne is launching a study on the effects of ketogenic dietary regimens in patients affected by hereditary polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD).

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