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Life Sciences - Physics - 24.11.2023
How Bacteria Defend Themselves Against Plasmas
How Bacteria Defend Themselves Against Plasmas
A heat shock protein protects the cells against protein clumping. It degrades, however, over longer treatment periods. Plasmas are used, for example, in wound treatment against pathogens that are resistant to antibiotics. However, bacteria can defend themselves: They employ a heat shock protein that protects them.

Life Sciences - Physics - 21.11.2023
Tiny Beads Preserve Enzymes for Biocatalysis
Tiny Beads Preserve Enzymes for Biocatalysis
Plasmas can provide the co-substrate needed for biocatalysis of valuable substances, but are also harmful to enzymes. By attaching enzymes to small beads the enzymes are protected and remain active up to 44 times longer. Some enzymes, such as the one derived from fungi and investigated in this study, are able to produce valuable substances such as the fragrance (R)-1-phenylethanol.

Physics - Environment - 17.11.2023
Microplastics in arable soil: tomography with neutrons and X-rays shows where particles are deposited
Microplastics in arable soil: tomography with neutrons and X-rays shows where particles are deposited
A team of researchers from the University of Potsdam and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has developed a measuring method to analyze soil samples with neutrons and X-rays and create 3D tomographies from them: This makes it possible for the first time to precisely localize microplastics in the soil.

Physics - 13.11.2023
Trust is good, control is safer
Trust is good, control is safer
A sophisticated device uses radio waves to determine whether states are really complying with nuclear weapons treaties When it comes to nuclear weapons, no state really wants to leave anything to chance. A small movement in nuclear weapons stocks can have a major impact. It is therefore important to monitor nuclear weapons treaties effectively and closely.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 09.11.2023
Euclid Space Telescope Reveals First Scientific Images
Euclid Space Telescope Reveals First Scientific Images
Euclid, the new space telescope launched by the ESA with the involvement of German researchers, has published its first color photographs from outer space. Never before has a telescope been able to produce such sharp astronomical images of such a wide expanse of sky while looking so deep into the distant universe.

Physics - 08.11.2023
Generating cold with solids
Generating cold with solids
After more than a century, physicists aim to dethrone the tried-and-tested technology of the refrigerator, as cooling can be made more energy-efficient. The compressor technology used in today's refrigerators was invented more than a century ago. "The technology has been continuously optimized over the years, of course," says Daniel Hägele, physicist at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany.

Physics - Innovation - 30.10.2023
Monitoring nuclear weapons stockpiles with radio waves
Monitoring nuclear weapons stockpiles with radio waves
Monitoring whether states are complying with disarmament treaties is not an easy task. An international team has been exploring remote monitoring with the help of two antennas and a couple of mirrors. An international research team has proposed a new method for monitoring nuclear disarmament treaties.

Physics - Electroengineering - 26.10.2023
Spinaron, A Rugby in a Ball Pit
Spinaron, A Rugby in a Ball Pit
For the first time, experimental physicists from the Würzburg-Dresden Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat have demonstrated a new quantum effect aptly named the "spinaron." In a meticulously controlled environment and using an advanced set of instruments, they managed to prove the unusual state a cobalt atom assumes on a copper surface.

Physics - Health - 23.10.2023
Programmable matter: 'We can paint with the particles'
Programmable matter: ’We can paint with the particles’
Researchers find new physical effects in systems consisting of particles with an orientation-dependent propulsion speed Investigating systems consisting of self-propelled particles - so-called active particles - is a rapidly growing area of research. In theoretical models for active particles, it is often assumed that the particles' swimming speed is always the same.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.10.2023
A miniature magnetic resonance imager made of diamond
A miniature magnetic resonance imager made of diamond
Quantum sensors make microscale NMR spectroscopy possible A miniature magnetic resonance Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an important imaging method in research which can be used to visualize tissue and structures without damaging them. The technique is better known from the medical field as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), where the patient is moved into a bore of a large magnet on a table.

Chemistry - Physics - 18.10.2023
Chemists present method for the fluorination of enines
Chemists present method for the fluorination of enines
Research team from the University of Münster presents synthesis method in Nature Chemistry Fluorinated small molecules are very often used to produce medicines or agrochemicals. However, they rarely occur naturally. The societal importance of fluorinated substances, combined with the lack of natural sources, has created a demand for effective, sustainable methods to generate new fluorinated motifs - molecular structures containing one or more fluorine atom - from relatively simple starting materials.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 11.10.2023
Central star in a planetary nebula reveals details of its life
Central star in a planetary nebula reveals details of its life
Stars like our sun end their lives as white dwarfs. Some of them are surrounded by a planetary nebula consisting of gas ejected by the dying star shortly before its death. An international research team led by Professor Klaus Werner of the Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of has for the first time studied a central star of a planetary nebula located in an open star cluster.

Physics - Life Sciences - 09.10.2023
Microscopes: Looking deep into hidden worlds
Microscopes: Looking deep into hidden worlds
Five high-performance microscopes at the University of Münster Many people are as fascinated by the microworld and the nanoworld as others are by the cosmos or the deep seas. These worlds seem to be inaccessible, apparently hidden from human eyes. However, across a wide range of disciplines, microscopes make it possible to take ever deeper and more precise looks at the smallest of details, and in ever higher resolutions - right down to atomic structures.

Physics - Materials Science - 06.10.2023
A treasure chest for researchers
A treasure chest for researchers
Physicists investigate 2D materials with very special properties Postdoc Dr. Nihit Saigal, a member of Prof. Ursula Wurstbauer's team at Münster University's Institute of Physics, has got everything ready in the laboratory to produce an ultra-thin, two-dimensional material - a silver-coloured crystal of molybdenum disulphide, a viscoelastic polymer film.

Chemistry - Physics - 02.10.2023
Water makes all the difference
Water makes all the difference
Water is a major driving force in the formation of separate reaction compartments within cells. In order to fulfil their function, biological cells need to be divided into separate reaction compartments. This is sometimes done with membranes, and sometimes without them: the spontaneous segregation of certain types of biomolecules leads to the formation of so-called condensates.

Computer Science - Physics - 29.09.2023
'Munich is becoming a hotspot for quantum computing software'
’Munich is becoming a hotspot for quantum computing software’
Interview with Prof. Robert Wille on quantum computing software Most of us use software applications on a daily basis, for example when writing emails or surfing the internet. But how will future programs look like when new technologies such as quantum computers arrive on the scene? Prof. Robert Wille and his team are already developing the software of tomorrow today.

Physics - Chemistry - 25.09.2023
Crystallization as the Driving Force
Crystallization as the Driving Force
Scientists from the Friedrich Schiller University of Jena and the Friedrich Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg have successfully developed nanomaterials using a so-called bottom-up approach. As reported in the scientific journal ACS Nano, they exploit the fact that crystals often grow in a specific direction during crystallisation.

Physics - Sport - 21.09.2023
Unexpected curveball in miniature
Unexpected curveball in miniature
Team of researchers including Göttingen University detect Magnus effect at microscopic level Whether you are familiar with the term -Magnus effect- or not, you have certainly seen it in action. It is when a spinning ball - for instance in football, cricket or baseball - bends away from its expected trajectory, often to the surprise of the opposing team.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 20.09.2023
Hiccups in the starry nursery
Hiccups in the starry nursery
Before the light comes on and a new star shines, enough gas and dust must accumulate in a very small space for a star's energy source, nuclear fusion, to ignite. This by no means happens at rest. Matter swirls around, and before the star sees the light of day, violent birth labour is not uncommon. The new James Webb Space Telescope has turned its lens on such a spectacle, which reveals itself in unprecedented detail.

Chemistry - Physics - 15.09.2023
Precisely arranging nanoparticles
Research team at Göttingen University develops plasmonic molecules from nanoparticles In the incredibly small world of molecules, the elementary building blocks - the atoms - join together in a very regular pattern. In contrast, in the macroscopic world with its larger particles, there is much greater disorder when particles connect.



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