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Results 101 - 120 of 586.


Chemistry - Physics - 27.04.2023
How Spheres Become Worms
How Spheres Become Worms
A previously unknown form of hydrogel formation has been elucidated: chemists found unusual interactions between polymers. Hydrogels? Many people use these substances without knowing it. As superabsorbents in nappies, for example, hydrogels absorb a lot of liquid. In the process, the initially dry material becomes Jelly-like, but it does not wet.

Life Sciences - Physics - 27.04.2023
Wiggly proteins guard the genome
Wiggly proteins guard the genome
Tiny pores in the cell nucleus play an essential role for healthy aging by protecting and preserving the genetic material. A team in Germany from the Department of Theoretical Biophysics at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt am Main and the Synthetic Biophysics of Protein Disorder Group at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has literally filled a hole in the understanding of the structure and function of these nuclear pores.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 25.04.2023
The digestive system of the mass monster M87
The digestive system of the mass monster M87
A few years ago, the image of an orange glowing donut caused a sensation. For the first time, researchers have captured an image of the immediate vicinity of a supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy M87. This galaxy is known for a jet that accelerates matter far out of the galaxy, driven by the central black hole.

Physics - Chemistry - 14.04.2023
How one photon becomes four charge carriers
How one photon becomes four charge carriers
Some materials convert photons into more free charges than would be expected. Using an ultrafast film, researchers have now been able to get a picture of this process. Physicists from the University of Würzburg were also involved. Photovoltaics, the conversion of light to electricity, is a key technology for sustainable energy.

Mathematics - Physics - 14.04.2023
'Learning from one another means we arrive at findings faster'
’Learning from one another means we arrive at findings faster’
Hendrik Weber and Raimar Wulkenhaar from the -Mathematics Münster- Cluster of Excellence work together on mathematical solutions Excellent research is not possible without interdisciplinary working. But, even within one discipline, collaborations crossing the barriers between research areas can lead to new approaches and findings.

Physics - Chemistry - 12.04.2023
Quantum effects demonstrated in the collision of hydrogen molecules with noble gas atoms
A research team of Freie Universität Berlin has shown how hydrogen molecules behave quantum mechanically when they collide with noble gas atoms such as helium or neon. In the study published in the journal "Science," the scientists used simulations to establish a direct link between measurements of atoms and molecules taken in experiments and theoretical models; the study includes both theoretical calculations and data from experiments conducted at the Technical University of Dortmund and the Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel).

Life Sciences - Physics - 12.04.2023
Enzyme that breaks down PET plastic: Leipzig scientists increase efficiency
Enzyme that breaks down PET plastic: Leipzig scientists increase efficiency
One of the most widely used plastics in the world is polyethylene terephthalate, or PET for short. It is everywhere in our daily lives in the form of reusable PET drinks bottles. At the end of the lifecycle of a product containing PET, the environmentally friendly reuse of the PET components through the activity of enzymes is an economically and ecologically interesting alternative to incineration, landfill or purely chemical recycling.

Physics - Chemistry - 12.04.2023
Quantum Effects Detected in Hydrogen and Noble Gas Collisions
Study by Freie Universität quantum physicist Professor Christiane Koch published in "Science" A Freie Universität Berlin research team headed by quantum physicist Professor Christiane Koch has demonstrated how hydrogen molecules behave when they collide with noble gas atoms such as helium or neon. In an article published in the journal Science , the researchers describe how they used simulations to draw connections between data from experiments and theoretical models of quantum physics ( www.science.org/doi/abs/10.1126/science.adf9888 ).

Physics - Pharmacology - 11.04.2023
Neutrons for better vaccines against multidrug resistant germs
Neutrons for better vaccines against multidrug resistant germs
Reading time 3 min. FRM II lets scientists look deep inside the structure of biomolecules Neutrons from the Research Neutron Source Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) can be used to explore the structure of biomolecules. The most recent success: the precise analysis of a promising vaccine against multidrug resistant germs.

Physics - Materials Science - 06.04.2023
An important step towards the quantum internet
An important step towards the quantum internet
The cornerstone for 1000-fold improvement in communication rates for bridging long distances. Diamond is of great importance for future technologies such as the quantum internet. Special defect centers can be used as quantum bits (qubits) and emit single photons. To enable data transmission with practicable communication rates over long distances in the quantum network, all photons must be collected in optical fibers and transmitted without being lost.

Physics - Materials Science - 05.04.2023
International Research Team Develops Method to Characterize Nanomaterials
International Research Team Develops Method to Characterize Nanomaterials
Researchers from Paderborn University, the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM),Italy's national metrology institute, the Politecnico di Torino, Italy, and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), National Metrology Institute of Germany, have studied sequential infiltration synthesis in nanostructured polymers.

Physics - Life Sciences - 31.03.2023
New Type of Friction Discovered in Ligand-Protein Systems
A team from the University of Freiburg and the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt-am-Main identifies anisotropic friction An interdisciplinary research team of the Institutes of Physical Chemistry and Physics of the University of Freiburg and the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt-am-Main has discovered a new, direction-dependent friction in proteins called anisotropic friction.

Physics - Materials Science - 27.03.2023
Separated at last
Separated at last
Scientists at the Universities of Würzburg and Ottawa have solved the decades-old problem of distinguishing between single and multiple light excitations. They present their new method in the journal Nature. The construction of the first laser in 1960 ushered in commercial applications with light that have become an integral part of our everyday lives.

Physics - 23.03.2023
New ATLAS result weighs in on the W boson
New ATLAS result weighs in on the W boson
Physicists present new result of the ATLAS detector The W boson is the mediator particle of the electroweak force. Discovered in the 1980s at CERN, its properties remain challenging to measure within the Standard Model of particle physics. An international team has now presented a new and improved W-boson mass measurement by the ATLAS experiment at CERN.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.03.2023
Surprise in the Quantum World
Surprise in the Quantum World
Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat have achieved a significant milestone in the pursuit of energy-efficient quantum technologies by designing a ferromagnetic topological insulator. In 2019, an international research team headed by materials chemist Anna Isaeva, at that time a junior professor at ct.qmat (Complexity and Topology in Quantum Matter), caused a stir by fabricating the world's first antiferromagnetic topological insulator - manganese bismuth telluride (MnBi 2 Te4).

Physics - Chemistry - 21.03.2023
Surprise from the quantum world
Surprise from the quantum world
The Würzburg-Dresden Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat has designed a ferromagnetic topological insulator - a milestone on the way to energy-efficient quantum technologies. Back in 2019, an international research team led by materials chemist Anna Isaeva - then a junior professor at the Würzburg-Dresden Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat - Complexity and Topology in Quantum Materials - achieved a minor sensation with the fabrication of the first antiferromagnetic topological insulator manganese bismuth telluride (MnBi 2 Te4).

Chemistry - Physics - 21.03.2023
Smart light traps
Smart light traps
Synthesis gas and battery power from sunlight energy Plants use photosynthesis to harvest energy from sunlight. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have applied this principle as the basis for developing new sustainable processes which in the future may produce syngas (synthetic gas) for the large-scale chemical industry and be able to charge batteries.

Physics - Chemistry - 14.03.2023
Magnifier for quantum excitations
Magnifier for quantum excitations
Scientists at TU Ilmenau have succeeded in realizing and understanding in detail a molecular magnifying glass for the lattice vibrations of a two-dimensional material. The results of the work, which are the result of many years of intensive joint research with theoretical physicist Mads Brandbyge from TU Denmark, have just been published in Physical Review Letters , the most important journal for physics research.

Physics - 13.03.2023
Understanding quantum mechanics with active particles
Understanding quantum mechanics with active particles
Physicists discover unexpected connection between active particles and quantum-mechanical systems The study of active particles is one of the fastest-growing areas of physics. With "active particles" physicists refer to objects which move by themselves as a result of internal self-propulsion. These include living things such as bacteria and fish swimming, birds flying or humans walking around - as well as artificial nano-robots which can be inserted into the body to transport medication.

Physics - 10.03.2023
Hotter than infinity - Light pulses can behave like an exotic gas
Hotter than infinity - Light pulses can behave like an exotic gas
In our modern society huge amounts of data are transmitted every day, mainly as short optical pulses propagating through glass fibres. With the steadily increasing density of such optical signals, their interaction grows, which can lead to data loss. Physicists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the College of Optics and Photonics in Orlando, Florida are investigating how to control large numbers of optical pulses as precisely as possible to reduce the effect of such interactions.