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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
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Life Sciences



Results 661 - 680 of 821.


Life Sciences - Health - 05.03.2017
Conflict or coexistence
Conflict or coexistence
Competition within mixed bacterial populations can give rise to complex growth dynamics. LMU researchers are probing the interplay between differential growth rates and stochastic factors in determining the composition of such populations. How do bacteria react to fluctuations in their environment? How do they respond to abiotic stresses or to competition with other microbes' And in mixed populations, what factors determine which of the competing species or strains win out in the end? These questions are not easy to answer, for bacterial communities represent complex and dynamic ecosystems.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.02.2017
In the molecular bench vise
In the molecular bench vise
Research news The genome molecule contains the blueprint for life. The manner in which the blueprint is packed into the cell determines which genes are active and which are set to inactive. Disturbing this structure can result in illnesses such as cancer. Munich scientists have now succeeded in using molecular "tweezers" made from DNA to measure interactions at the first packaging level of the genome.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.02.2017
Baden-Württemberg Foundation Funds Research Project on Protein Aggregation
Heidelberg molecular biologist Bernd Bukau has been awarded a grant of approximately 280,000 euros from the Baden-Württemberg Foundation for a research project on the neurodegenerative disorder of Parkinson's disease. The project is a continuation of the previous work by Prof. Bukau and his team on the dissolution of protein aggregates that are responsible for a number of different diseases, including Alzheimer's.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.02.2017
Epilepsy gene identified in dogs
Epilepsy gene identified in dogs
Many breeds of dogs are prone to epileptic seizures. Veterinary neurologists and geneticists have now localized the mutation responsible for a specific form of epilepsy in Rhodesian ridgebacks. Rhodesian ridgebacks were originally bred for use in lion hunts, which explains why these these dogs are strongly built and robust.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.02.2017
Hairpins help each other out
Hairpins help each other out
The evolution of cells and organisms is thought to have been preceded by a phase in which informational molecules like DNA could be replicated selectively. New work shows that hairpin structures make particularly effective DNA replicators. In the metabolism of all living organisms there is a clear division of labor: Nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) carry the information for the synthesis of proteins, and proteins provide the structural and executive functions required by cells, such as the controlled and specific catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes.

Life Sciences - 14.02.2017
Researchers investigate mechanical features of cells: An optical method for cell analysis and manipulation in the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence
Researchers investigate mechanical features of cells: An optical method for cell analysis and manipulation in the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence
Cells form tissues or organs, migrate from place to place and in doing that their mechanical features and forces generated within them play a key role. Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence at Münster University have now investigated the mechanical features of cells in living zebrafish embryos using the holographic optical tweezers-based method.

Life Sciences - Environment - 05.02.2017
On mosaics and melting-pots
On mosaics and melting-pots
Genetic studies of cichlid fishes suggest that interspecies hybrids played a prominent role in their evolution. Analysis of a unique fossil cichlid from the Upper Miocene of East Africa now provides further support for this idea. The cichlids constitute one of the most diverse families of freshwater fishes in tropical habitats.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 01.02.2017
Basement membrane protein influences the connection of blood vessel cells: Tracking inflammatory processes / Study produced by researchers at Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence
Basement membrane protein influences the connection of blood vessel cells: Tracking inflammatory processes / Study produced by researchers at Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence
Which molecular mechanisms are at work when, in the case of inflammation, immune cells migrate from the blood vessel into the tissue? Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence at Münster University have gained new insights into this question: the laminin 511 protein, that underlies endothelial cells that form the inner cell layer of the blood vessel wall, influences how permeable the vessel is for immune cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.01.2017
Antibodies as 'messengers' in the nervous system
Antibodies as ‘messengers’ in the nervous system
Research news Antibodies are able to activate human nerve cells within milliseconds and hence modify their function - that is the surprising conclusion of a study carried out at Human Biology at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). This knowledge improves our understanding of illnesses that accompany certain types of cancer, above all severe intestinal malfunctions.

Life Sciences - 25.01.2017
Sizing up spaces by ear
Sizing up spaces by ear
Humans can be trained to use echolocation to estimate the sizes of enclosed spaces. LMU researchers now show that the learning process involves close coordination between sensory and motor cortex. In principle, humans need not rely solely on vision for orientation. Some blind persons make use of self-generated sounds to estimate their position and orientation in an enclosed space relative to reflecting surfaces.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.01.2017
Take the mRNA train
Take the mRNA train
Messenger RNAs bearing the genetic information for the synthesis of proteins are delivered to defined sites in the cell cytoplasm by molecular motors. LMU researchers have elucidated how the motors recognize their mRNA freight. Messenger RNAs carry the information for the assembly of proteins from the DNA in the cell nucleus to the sites of protein synthesis in the cytoplasm, and are crucial for cell function.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.01.2017
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
How ancestry shapes our immune cells
A genetic variant that is particularly prevalent in people of African ancestry confers protection against malaria. LMU researchers have now shown how it modulates the properties of white blood cells that play a major role in immune defenses and inflammation. Virtually the entire population of sub-Saharan Africa, and some 70% of African Americans, carry a gene variant (allele) which results in a trait referred to as Duffy-negative.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.01.2017
Tailoring individual therapies for Multiple Sclerosis
Tailoring individual therapies for Multiple Sclerosis
Research news A large global new partnership called 'MultipleMS', coordinated by Karolinska Institute in Sweden, has been awarded 15 million euro from the European Commission in the Horizon2020 program to find novel and better treatments for Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In this project, 21 universities and companies from Europe and the USA will unite efforts to tailor the development and application of therapies to the individual MS patient.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.01.2017
Stocking up on spare parts
Stocking up on spare parts
LMU researchers show, for the first time, that the orientation of the plane of division of neural stem cells at a specific stage during embryonic development determines the capacity of the adult brain to replace nerve cells. Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, but also strokes or other types of traumatic brain damage, result in the death of nerve cells in the brain.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 22.12.2016
How Social Factors Can Influence Hunting
How Social Factors Can Influence Hunting
Due to a shortage of natural predators, wild animal populations are often controlled through hunting. Whether a hunter shoots at an animal depends not only on specific hunting criteria, but is also significantly influenced by social factors - such as competition with other hunters. This was demonstrated in a study directed by Florian Diekert, economist at Heidelberg University.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2016
An inhibitor's inhibitor
An inhibitor’s inhibitor
An international team of researchers has shown why a standard treatment for the aggressive blood-cell cancer AML so often fails. The study uncovers a new biomarker that predicts the efficacy of the chemotherapy and identifies a new drug target. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer that is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of certain types of white blood cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.12.2016
New key players found in fighting fungi
New key players found in fighting fungi
Research news Fungal infections are a serious health risk. They can be harmful especially to patients whose immune system is compromised through illness or chemotherapy. A team working at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered an important mechanism in the body's defenses against fungi.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.12.2016
The needle in the haystack
The needle in the haystack
Research news New cancer therapies harness the immune system to fight tumors. One of the main principles behind these therapies is to find out precisely which molecules on cancer cells trigger an immune response. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry has for the first time identified suitable protein structures directly from patients` tumor cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2016
Early signs in cerebrospinal fluid
Early signs in cerebrospinal fluid
Little is known about the role of the brain's immune system in Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU) Munich and the Munich site of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) have now found an early immune response in individuals with a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer's: their brain's showed abnormal immune reactions as early as about seven years before the expected onset of dementia.

Life Sciences - 08.12.2016
Stress leads to an internal reorganization of the body's cells
Stress leads to an internal reorganization of the body’s cells
A stressful job, trouble with the children and a near-empty bank account. When everything starts to get too much again, it can help to make a fresh start. If cells are under a lot of stress, for example as a result of injuries, they also undergo a fundamental reorganization. It's all about their cytoskeleton, which again and again forms new structures from many individual components in a highly flexible way, for example in order to support the cell or to transport molecular charges.