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Life Sciences - 31.01.2024
Time travel through genomics
Time travel through genomics
Viruses adapt quickly to new conditions, which is accompanied by a change in their genome. This also applies to a special group of viruses, the bacteriophages. A research team from Poland, the Netherlands and Germany has now successfully reconstructed numerous old phage genomes. These include a genome that is around 1,300 years old and is very similar to the modern "Mushuvirus mushu", which infects intestinal bacteria.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2024
News on drug-induced skin swelling
News on drug-induced skin swelling
Bonn researchers identify novel risk locus in the genome for ACE inhibitor-induced angioedema Angioedema is a rare but potentially life-threatening adverse reaction to ACE inhibitors. In a joint analysis of eight European study collectives, researchers from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB), the University of Bonn and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) for the first time conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with more than 1,000 affected individuals.

Life Sciences - Health - 31.01.2024
Bacterium uses toxin to kill insects
Bacterium uses toxin to kill insects
Max Planck researchers from Dortmund reveal the first-ever detailed structure of the bacterial toxin Mcf1   During infection insect-killing bacteria typically release toxins to slay their hosts. The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens , for example, pumps insect larvae full of the lethal 'Makes caterpillars floppy 1' (Mcf1) toxin, leading them to first become droopy and then dead.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 31.01.2024
Homo sapiens already reached northwest Europe more than 45,000 years ago
Homo sapiens already reached northwest Europe more than 45,000 years ago
The arrival of Homo sapiens in cold northern latitudes took place several thousand years before Neanderthals disappeared in southwest Europe An international research team reports the discovery of Homo sapiens fossils from the cave site Ilsenhöhle in Ranis, Germany. Directly dated to approximately 45,000 years ago, these fossils are associated with elongated stone points partly shaped on both sides (known as partial bifacial blade points), which are characteristic of the Lincombian-Ranisian-Jerzmanowician (LRJ).

Physics - Life Sciences - 29.01.2024
Using active microparticles for artificial intelligence
Using active microparticles for artificial intelligence
Artificial intelligence with neural networks performs calculations digitally with the help of microelectronic chips. Physicists at Leipzig University have now realized a form of neural network that does not work with electricity but with so-called active colloidal particles. Their publication in the renowned journal "Nature Communications" deals with the use of these microparticles as a physical system for artificial intelligence and the prediction of time series.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 24.01.2024
New pieces in the puzzle of first life on Earth
New pieces in the puzzle of first life on Earth
Research team discovers complex microbial communities in ecosystems over 3 billion years ago Microorganisms were the first forms of life on our planet. The clues are written in 3.5 billion-year-old rocks by geochemical and morphological traces, such as chemical compounds or structures that these organisms left behind.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.01.2024
Networkers in cramped conditions
Networkers in cramped conditions
More than 1,000 players are involved in a cell when genetic information is translated into proteins. A new German-Israeli research project is now working on systematically identifying their respective tasks. When genetic information in human cells is transported from the cell nucleus into the cytoplasm and translated into proteins, one particular molecule plays a central role: mRNA, or messenger RNA.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.01.2024
Complex green organisms emerged a billion years ago
Complex green organisms emerged a billion years ago
Research team led by Göttingen University investigates the emergence of multicellularity Of all the organisms that photosynthesize, land plants have the most complex bodies. How did this morphology emerge? A team of scientists led by the University of Göttingen has taken a deep dive into the evolutionary history of morphological complexity in streptophytes , which include land plants and many green algae.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.01.2024
Antibiotics highjack bacterial immunity
Antibiotics highjack bacterial immunity
Bacteria have an immune system that protects them against viruses known as bacteriophages. A research team from the Universities of and Würzburg has now shown how this immune system enhances the effect of specific antibiotics against the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae . The immune system is the reason why this bacterium is particularly sensitive to one of the oldest known classes of antibiotics - the antifolates.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.01.2024
Exploding kamikaze bacteria
Exploding kamikaze bacteria
"Soldier" bacteria filled with toxins sacrifice themselves for the benefit of their conspecifics, giving them pathogenic properties For their invasion pathogenic bacteria target the host's defense mechanisms and vital cell functions with toxins. Before these deadly substances can attack host cells, bacteria must first export them from their production site - the cytoplasm - using dedicated secretion systems.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2024
Scientific Year Environment and Health: Research for a healthy life
Scientific Year Environment and Health: Research for a healthy life
Technologies that pave the way for our well-being - in numerous interdisciplinary research projects, scientists at TU Ilmenau are developing innovative technological solutions that improve our quality of life. At the kick-off of the new Scientific Year Environment and Health, researchers spoke about their pioneering work.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.01.2024
Special RNA suppresses the formation of breast cancer cells
Special RNA suppresses the formation of breast cancer cells
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. The development of breast cancer often originates from epithelial cells in the mammary gland - the very cells that specialise in milk production during and after pregnancy. A team of researchers from Friedrich Schiller University Jena , the university in Shenzhen (China) and Jena University Hospital has taken a closer look at this specialisation process and deciphered a molecular mechanism that also appears to play an important role in cancer development.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2024
Tracking Molecules at Turbo Speed
Tracking Molecules at Turbo Speed
University of Bonn researchers devise method to speed up observations of high-throughput microbiological process Being able to observe micro-organisms and their cellular components is key to understanding fundamental processes that go on inside cells-and thus potentially developing new medical treatments.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.01.2024
Lupus trigger discovered
Lupus trigger discovered
Researchers were able to trace a form of the autoimmune disease lupus back to a single mutation   Sometimes a single mutation in our genetic make-up is enough to cause disease. This is also the case with the autoimmune disease lupus. Lupus causes severe inflammation throughout the body and can have a serious impact on the lives of those affected.

Life Sciences - 12.01.2024
How Fruit Flies Smell CO2
How Fruit Flies Smell CO2
CO2 is an important source of information for insects. And the receptors that help them to detect it might also be useful for completely different applications. Mosquitoes in search of blood as well as fruit flies looking for a place to lay their eggs navigate using CO2, which is produced during respiration or in fermentation processes.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 12.01.2024
Cause of listlessness in depression discovered
Cause of listlessness in depression discovered
Lack of activation of the locus coeruleus in the brain inhibits the inner drive Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich, Germany,  have discovered that the dilation of the pupil in response to an expected reward depends on whether a person can feel pleasure. This indicates that insufficient activity of the locus coeruleus in the brain is largely responsible for the lack of drive in people with depression.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.01.2024
Metabolic alteration to increase the stress tolerance of tobacco plants
Metabolic alteration to increase the stress tolerance of tobacco plants
Plant biotechnologists elucidate the mechanism that leads to higher seed yields in tobacco plants by transporting fatty acids - in addition to sugar - via the nutrient-carrying transport vessels When there is drought, a pathogen attack, or too much salt in the soil, plants are faced with a constant series of stress factors.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2024
Main regulator for the body's oven discovered
Main regulator for the body’s oven discovered
Brown fat cells convert energy into heat - a key to eliminating unwanted fat deposits. In addition, they also protect against cardiovascular diseases. Researchers from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the Transdisciplinary Research Area "Life & Health" at the University of Bonn have now identified the protein EPAC1 as a new pharmacological target to increase brown fat mass and activity.

Life Sciences - 08.01.2024
A foreign language is transforming the brain
A foreign language is transforming the brain
Learning a second language strengthens neural connections in the language network in the left hemisphere of the brain Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have unearthed fascinating evidence that the brain undergoes important changes in wiring when we embark on the journey of learning a new language in adulthood.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.01.2024
The gut microbiome prevents dangerous immune reactions
The gut microbiome prevents dangerous immune reactions
Certain combinations of gut bacteria protect stem cell transplantation patients After stem cell transplantation, the donated immune cells sometimes attack the patients' bodies. This is known as graft versus host disease or GvHD. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Universitätsklinikum Regensburg (UKR) have shown that GvHD is much less common when certain microbes are present in the gut.