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Life Sciences - Health - 21.03.2024
Maize genes control little helpers in the soil
Maize genes control little helpers in the soil
Tiny organisms such as bacteria and fungi help to promote the health and function of plant roots. It is commonly assumed that the composition of these microbes is dependent on the properties of the soil. However, an international team of researchers led by the University of Bonn has now discovered when studying different local varieties of maize that the genetic makeup of the plants also helps to influence which microorganisms cluster around the roots.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.03.2024
Cells inherit protection from sunburn
Cells inherit protection from sunburn
UV radiation in the sunlight causes sunburn and increases the risk of skin cancer by damaging our DNA but also our RNA. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg, Germany, have now unveiled a cellular shield that protect cells from the harmful effects of damaged RNA caused by ultraviolet radiation.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.03.2024
The laborious path of a fungal toxin
The laborious path of a fungal toxin
The toxin Candidalysin of the yeast Candida albicans is incorporated into an unusual protein structure during an infection, the composition of which has so far been a mystery to scientists. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology (Leibniz-HKI) have now succeeded in deciphering the function of this unusual arrangement.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.03.2024
Newly discovered receptor influences gut development in fruit flies
Newly discovered receptor influences gut development in fruit flies
Adhesion GPCRs are a group of G protein-coupled receptors associated with many bodily functions and diseases in humans. Scientists at Leipzig University have discovered a new receptor - which they have named "mayo" - and found that it influences the development of the small intestine and heart function in fruit flies, and that these phenomena may also be relevant in humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.03.2024
Same Target, Different Effects
Same Target, Different Effects
Even if they attack the same target in the bacterial cell, the cellular response to different antibiotics can vary. There is an urgent need for new antimicrobial strategies to keep pathogens in check. This applies specifically to Gram-negative bacteria, which are protected from antibiotic intervention by a thick second membrane.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2024
Interaction between metabolic health and healthy aging supported
Ribosomes, the "translation factories" of the cell, are cellular organelles that play a central role in protein synthesis, a vital process for all living organisms. These tiny structures themselves consist of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proteins and are essential for the survival and normal functioning of the cell, as the proteins they produce are required for nearly all cellular processes, including structure, function, and regulation.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 13.03.2024
Stronger than Nature: Optimised Radicals as Potential Novel Catalysts
Research team redesigns phenoxyl radicals with improved oxidation capacity in the lab. Nature uses enzymes for various metabolic processes. These biological catalysts are extremely efficient. Biomimetic catalysts based on inexpensive starting materials from the laboratory that can reproduce the efficiency of the natural enzymes and can function at ambient conditions are therefore of great interest to research and industry.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.03.2024
A giant called MIMAS in the cell power plants
A giant called MIMAS in the cell power plants
Freiburg research team discovers mega-protein complex with surprising properties in mitochondria Mitochondria provide the majority of the body's energy supply and are considered the power plants of the cells. The energy comes from cellular respiration, in which metabolic products are burned in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.03.2024
The right approach increases willingness to donate stem cells
The right approach increases willingness to donate stem cells
Every year, more than 20,000 people in Germany die from blood cancer. In children, blood cancer is even the most common type of cancer. Donations of stem cells from bone marrow or blood increase the chance of survival for people suffering from leukemia or other forms of blood cancer. However, it can take years between the registration of those willing to donate and their actual donation.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 11.03.2024
Following Proteins on Their Journey
Following Proteins on Their Journey
Team of researchers at Freie Universität Berlin develops new technique to release and study individual proteins in cells / Study published in "Nature Methods" A research team led by biochemist Professor Helge Ewers from Freie Universität Berlin has developed a new technique for the light-mediated release and investigation of proteins in live cells.

Life Sciences - 06.03.2024
Learning from conspecifics
Learning from conspecifics
Chimpanzees that are unable to figure out a complex puzzle on their own, are capable of learning the solution from other chimps that were trained to solve it. This is the conclusion reached by an international research team from Utrecht University, the University of St Andrews and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology as part of a study conducted with groups of chimpanzees in Zambia.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.03.2024
Early life adversity leaves long-term signatures in baboon DNA
Early life adversity leaves long-term signatures in baboon DNA
Study shows multiple pathways connect early life adversity to later life health Early experiences in an animal's life can have a significant impact on its capacity to thrive, even years or decades later, and DNA methylation may help record their effects. In a study of 256 wild baboons, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Duke University found that resource limitation during early life was associated with many differences in DNA methylation, a small chemical mark on the DNA sequence that can affect gene activity.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.03.2024
Turn on the TV!
Turn on the TV!
Does television make you stupid? Dr. Matthias Nürnberger from the Department of Neurology at Jena University Hospital investigated this in a prospective study. The results showed that excessive television consumption can even have a positive effect on both visual information processing and motor learning ability, in some cases significantly so.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.03.2024
First step towards early diagnosis of metastases
First step towards early diagnosis of metastases
Team involving the University of Freiburg has developed a new method for analyzing the basement membrane in the human lung Metastases are largely responsible for the mortality of patients with solid cancers; the prognosis of cancer patients is significantly reduced when metastases are diagnosed. To date, there are no methods that allow a reliable prediction of the probability of future metastases.

Life Sciences - Physics - 02.03.2024
First heat map for individual red blood cells
First heat map for individual red blood cells
Researchers measure heat flow: from active metabolic forces inside cell to flickering cell membrane Entropy is often associated with disorder and chaos, but in biology it is related to energy efficiency and is closely linked to metabolism, the set of chemical reactions that sustain life. This research was led by the Universities of Barcelona and Padua, with the participation of Göttingen University and the Universities Complutense and Francisco de Vitoria in Madrid.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.02.2024
Fibre against pounds
Fibre against pounds
A diet based on resistant starch promotes a favorable composition of the gut microbiome in obese people. This leads to weight reduction and measurable positive health outcomes such as improved insulin sensitivity. These were the findings of an international research team led by Professor Weiping Jia from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Professor Aimin Xu from the University of Hong Kong and Professor Gianni Panagiotou from Friedrich Schiller University Jena.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.02.2024
Long-term memory and lack of mental images
Long-term memory and lack of mental images
Bonn researchers find connection between autobiographical memory and aphantasia When people lack visual imagination, this is known as aphantasia. Researchers from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB), the University of Bonn and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) investigated how the lack of mental imagery affects long-term memory.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.02.2024
Modern hydropower plants also cause massive damage to ecology
Modern hydropower plants also cause massive damage to ecology
Scientific study on river habitats at the TUM Even modern and supposedly gentler hydropower plants cause considerable damage to river ecosystems. This is shown by a study by Prof. Jürgen Geist from the Chair of Aquatic Systems Biology at the TUM School of Life Sciences published in the "Journal of Applied Ecology".

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 22.02.2024
'Every person can learn to be more or less empathetic'
’Every person can learn to be more or less empathetic’
Empathy can be transferred. This means that people can learn or unlearn empathy by observing their environment. This is shown by a new study by Würzburg neuroscientist Grit Hein . With her latest evaluations of empathy skills, Würzburg professor Grit Hein has once again disproved the old adage: "What goes around comes around".

Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2024
Possible trigger for autoimmune diseases discovered
Possible trigger for autoimmune diseases discovered
Immune cells must learn not to attack the body itself. A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) has discovered a previously unknown mechanism behind this: other immune cells, the B cells, contribute to the "training" of the T cells in the thymus gland.