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Health - Life Sciences - 12.01.2024
Lupus trigger discovered
Lupus trigger discovered
Researchers were able to trace a form of the autoimmune disease lupus back to a single mutation   Sometimes a single mutation in our genetic make-up is enough to cause disease. This is also the case with the autoimmune disease lupus. Lupus causes severe inflammation throughout the body and can have a serious impact on the lives of those affected.

Life Sciences - 12.01.2024
How Fruit Flies Smell CO2
How Fruit Flies Smell CO2
CO2 is an important source of information for insects. And the receptors that help them to detect it might also be useful for completely different applications. Mosquitoes in search of blood as well as fruit flies looking for a place to lay their eggs navigate using CO2, which is produced during respiration or in fermentation processes.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 12.01.2024
Cause of listlessness in depression discovered
Cause of listlessness in depression discovered
Lack of activation of the locus coeruleus in the brain inhibits the inner drive Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry in Munich, Germany,  have discovered that the dilation of the pupil in response to an expected reward depends on whether a person can feel pleasure. This indicates that insufficient activity of the locus coeruleus in the brain is largely responsible for the lack of drive in people with depression.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.01.2024
Metabolic alteration to increase the stress tolerance of tobacco plants
Metabolic alteration to increase the stress tolerance of tobacco plants
Plant biotechnologists elucidate the mechanism that leads to higher seed yields in tobacco plants by transporting fatty acids - in addition to sugar - via the nutrient-carrying transport vessels When there is drought, a pathogen attack, or too much salt in the soil, plants are faced with a constant series of stress factors.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.01.2024
Main regulator for the body's oven discovered
Main regulator for the body’s oven discovered
Brown fat cells convert energy into heat - a key to eliminating unwanted fat deposits. In addition, they also protect against cardiovascular diseases. Researchers from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the Transdisciplinary Research Area "Life & Health" at the University of Bonn have now identified the protein EPAC1 as a new pharmacological target to increase brown fat mass and activity.

Life Sciences - 08.01.2024
A foreign language is transforming the brain
A foreign language is transforming the brain
Learning a second language strengthens neural connections in the language network in the left hemisphere of the brain Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have unearthed fascinating evidence that the brain undergoes important changes in wiring when we embark on the journey of learning a new language in adulthood.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.01.2024
The gut microbiome prevents dangerous immune reactions
The gut microbiome prevents dangerous immune reactions
Certain combinations of gut bacteria protect stem cell transplantation patients After stem cell transplantation, the donated immune cells sometimes attack the patients' bodies. This is known as graft versus host disease or GvHD. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Universitätsklinikum Regensburg (UKR) have shown that GvHD is much less common when certain microbes are present in the gut.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 05.01.2024
How memories are formed in the brain - a new role for the internal compass
How memories are formed in the brain - a new role for the internal compass
Since their discovery in the 1990s, the head-direction cells in the brain have been referred to as its "internal compass." These cells are activated when the head of an animal or human points in a certain direction, and are thought to be important for spatial orientation and navigation. Now a team of neuroscientists at the University of Tübingen has discovered that head-direction cells in mice do more than this.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.01.2024
Prostate cancer: Newly-developed inhibitor shows massive potential
Prostate cancer: Newly-developed inhibitor shows massive potential
New epigenetic inhibitor is also effective in treatment-resistant prostate cancer cells More than 65,000 men fall ill with prostate cancer each year in Germany. Twelve thousand of them develop a treatment-resistant form which eventually ends in death. Now, a team of researchers from the Medical Faculty at the University of Freiburg has developed an active substance that might in future represent a new treatment option.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.01.2024
How Bacteria load their syringes
How Bacteria load their syringes
Pathogenic bacteria use molecular "shuttle services" to fill their injection apparatus with the right product Many bacterial pathogens use small injection apparatuses to manipulate the cells of their hosts, such as humans, so that they can spread throughout the body. To do this, they need to fill their syringes with the relevant injection agent.

Life Sciences - 21.12.2023
Big impacts from small changes in cell
Big impacts from small changes in cell
Research at Göttingen and Warwick Universities reveals how filament interactions affect cellular networks Tiny things matter - for instance, one amino acid can completely alter the architecture of the cell. Researchers at the Universities of Göttingen and Warwick investigated the structure and mechanics of the main component of the cytoskeleton of the cell: a protein known as actin.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.12.2023
Common insect species are suffering the biggest losses
Common insect species are suffering the biggest losses
Small Tortoiseshell butterflies (Aglais urticae) are an example of a species with formerly high local abundances that has declined in number. Insect decline is being driven by losses among the locally more common species, according to a new study published in "Nature".

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 20.12.2023
Revealing close and distant relatives in ancient DNA with unprecedented precision
Revealing close and distant relatives in ancient DNA with unprecedented precision
Scientists have developed a new computational tool to detect up to second to third degree cousins using ancient genomes If two persons are biologically related, they share long stretches of DNA that they co-inherited from their recent common ancestor. These almost identically shared stretches of genomes are called IBD ("Identity by Descent") segments.

Life Sciences - 20.12.2023
First step towards synthetic CO2 fixation in living cells
First step towards synthetic CO2 fixation in living cells
Three modules forming a new-to-nature CO2 fixation cycle successfully implemented in E.coli Synthetic biology offers the opportunity to build biochemical pathways for the capture and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2). Researchers at the Max-Planck-Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology have developed a synthetic biochemical cycle that directly converts CO2 into the central building block Acetyl-CoA.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.12.2023
When the Cellular Waste Collector Doesn't Show Up
When the Cellular Waste Collector Doesn’t Show Up
Researchers have identified a mechanism that promotes the breakdown of harmful protein deposits. If it malfunctions, it can lead to Parkinson's disease. NEMO, a protein that is primarily associated with signaling processes in the immune system, prevents the deposition of protein aggregates that occur in Parkinson's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.12.2023
Novel antibiotic substance from the human nose
Novel antibiotic substance from the human nose
Researchers at the University of Tübingen have discovered a novel antibiotic substance from the human nose that can be used against pathogenic bacteria. Named epifadin, the molecule is produced from specific strains of the bacterial species Staphylococcus epidermidis , which occur on the mucous membrane of the inside wall of the nose.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 15.12.2023
Learning from Nature: How a fungus makes a hard job easier
Learning from Nature: How a fungus makes a hard job easier
The investigation of the biosynthesis of panepoxydone, an important substance for biomedical research, in basidiomycetes has revealed a new enzyme as an important catalyst. The results of the researchers from the Leibniz-HKI, the Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the Cluster of Excellence Balance of the Microverse have now been published in the journal "Angewandte Chemie International Edition".

Life Sciences - 15.12.2023
Acid Sensor and Calcium Store Discovered in Plants
Acid Sensor and Calcium Store Discovered in Plants
Using optogenetics, Würzburg researchers have detected a new acid sensor in plant cells that is addressing a cell-internal calcium store, as they report in the journal "Science". When plants are infected by pathogens, suffer from a lack of water or have to react to other external stimuli, the first thing they do is increase the proton and calcium concentration in the affected cells.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.12.2023
New Insights into Ecosystem Functions
New Insights into Ecosystem Functions
A DFG research group led by the University of Würzburg has developed a method that makes it possible to analyse the relationship between biodiversity within and between ecosystems and the multifunctionality of entire landscapes. Ecosystems fulfil a number of vital tasks: They store carbon, clean polluted water, pollinate plants and so on.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 13.12.2023
Was Human Height in the Neolithic Period Influenced by Cultural Factors?
Was Human Height in the Neolithic Period Influenced by Cultural Factors?
Team of international researchers analyzed the remains of over 1,500 individuals who lived roughly 6,000 to 8,000 years ago Body size differences between females and males in northern Europe during the early Neolithic period (6,000 to 8,000 years ago) may reflect cultural factors in play. The findings of an international research project led by the University of Pennsylvania (USA) suggest that differences in stature during that period cannot be explained solely by genetics and diet.