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Results 101 - 120 of 263.


Media - 26.03.2024
Do food and drink preferences influence migration flows?
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research used Facebook data to investigate the influence of cultural similarities on migration flows and found that cultural proximity plays as important a role in the choice of destination country as shared language and history. When people migrate, many factors play a role in their choice of destination: How well do you speak the new country's language?

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 25.03.2024
Scientific Drilling Unravels Historical Mystery Surrounding Santorini
Scientific Drilling Unravels Historical Mystery Surrounding Santorini
Santorini is one of the best-studied volcanic archipelagos in the world. An international drilling expedition has now for the first time used a scientific drill ship to explore and investigate the seafloor around the Greek volcanic island. The researchers have uncovered evidence of an underwater eruption in 726 CE, previously known only from historical records.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 25.03.2024
First global study of coastal seas as carbon dioxide reservoirs possible
First global study of coastal seas as carbon dioxide reservoirs possible
Coastal seas form a complex transition zone between the two largest CO2 sinks in the global carbon cycle: land and ocean. Ocean researchers have now succeeded for the first time in investigating the role of the coastal ocean in a seamless model representation. The team led by Dr. Moritz Mathis from the Cluster of Excellence for Climate Research CLICCS at Universität Hamburg and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon was able to show: The intensity of CO2 uptake is higher in coastal seas than in the open ocean.

Astronomy / Space - Life Sciences - 25.03.2024
Bacteria beyond Earth?
Bacteria beyond Earth?
Signs of life detectable in single ice grains emitted from moons orbiting Saturn and Jupiter The ice-encrusted oceans of some of the moons orbiting Saturn and Jupiter are prime candidates in the search for extraterrestrial life. A new lab-based study led by Freie Universität Berlin and the University of Washington, Seattle, shows that individual ice grains ejected from these planetary bodies may contain enough material for instruments headed there this fall to detect signs of life - if such life exists.

Environment - Economics - 22.03.2024
All Countries' Agri-Environmental Policies at a Glance
All Countries’ Agri-Environmental Policies at a Glance
University of Bonn researchers publish dataset of over 6,000 policies from all'over the world There can be no analysis without data. In this spirit, researchers from the University of Bonn and the Swiss Federal Institution of Technology (ETH) Zurich have published a database containing over 6,000 agri-environmental policies, thus enabling their peers as well as policymakers and businesses to seek answers to all manner of different questions.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.03.2024
Special poison helps to compete with bacteria on mucous membranes
Special poison helps to compete with bacteria on mucous membranes
Candida albicans is a fungus that occurs naturally in the digestive tract of most people. However, the fungus is not always harmless. It can cause mild to severe infections throughout the body. A toxin, Candidalysin, is involved in these infections. It appears to be of central importance in vaginal infections in particular.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.03.2024
Maize genes control little helpers in the soil
Maize genes control little helpers in the soil
Tiny organisms such as bacteria and fungi help to promote the health and function of plant roots. It is commonly assumed that the composition of these microbes is dependent on the properties of the soil. However, an international team of researchers led by the University of Bonn has now discovered when studying different local varieties of maize that the genetic makeup of the plants also helps to influence which microorganisms cluster around the roots.

Environment - Chemistry - 20.03.2024
Harnessing hydrogen at life's origin
Harnessing hydrogen at life’s origin
Researchers gain new insights into how the first cells on Earth were able to use hydrogen gas as an energy source Hydrogen gas (H2) is seen as a key to sustainable energy for the future. Yet it is an ancient form of energy. Even the very first cells on earth lived on H2, which was produced in hydrothermal vents.

Environment - 19.03.2024
Fairy circles: plant water stress causes Namibia's gaps in grass
Fairy circles: plant water stress causes Namibia’s gaps in grass
Researchers describe topsoil as "death zone" for fresh grass in the fairy circle Namibia's legendary fairy circles are mysterious, circular, bald patches in the dry grasslands on the edge of the Namib Desert. Their formation has been researched for decades and has recently been the subject of much debate.

Environment - 19.03.2024
Satellite images from US espionage programmes for ecology and nature conservation
The images taken by US spy satellites since the late 1950s have long been classified. They became publicly accessible in the late 1990s and are used, among others, in climate research and archaeology. Researchers from the Conservation Biogeography Lab of the Institute of Geography at Humboldt-Universität led by Tobias Kümmerle also take interest in the black-and-white photographs.

Physics - Chemistry - 19.03.2024
Spectroscopy and theory shed light on excitons in semiconductors
Spectroscopy and theory shed light on excitons in semiconductors
Research team led by Göttingen University make extremely fast, precise images for first time From solar panels on our roofs to the new OLED TV screens, many everyday electronic devices simply wouldn't work without the interaction between light and the materials that make up semiconductors. A new category of semiconductors is based on organic molecules, which largely consist of carbon, such as buckminsterfullerene.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.03.2024
Cells inherit protection from sunburn
Cells inherit protection from sunburn
UV radiation in the sunlight causes sunburn and increases the risk of skin cancer by damaging our DNA but also our RNA. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg, Germany, have now unveiled a cellular shield that protect cells from the harmful effects of damaged RNA caused by ultraviolet radiation.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.03.2024
The laborious path of a fungal toxin
The laborious path of a fungal toxin
The toxin Candidalysin of the yeast Candida albicans is incorporated into an unusual protein structure during an infection, the composition of which has so far been a mystery to scientists. Researchers at the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology (Leibniz-HKI) have now succeeded in deciphering the function of this unusual arrangement.

Environment - 18.03.2024
Reaching under the wings of birds in the agricultural landscape
Reaching under the wings of birds in the agricultural landscape
Research team shows links between agricultural landscape structure and bird populations . The intensification of agriculture has its price: it makes landscapes structurally more uniform and thus contributes to the decline in biodiversity. How should agricultural landscapes be designed in order to promote biodiversity? A new study by researchers from the University of Göttingen, the Dachverband Deutscher Avifaunisten (DDA) e. V.

Physics - 18.03.2024
Where quantum computers can score
Where quantum computers can score
The travelling salesman problem is considered a prime example of combinatorial optimization problems. Now a Berlin team led by theoretical physicist Jens Eisert from Freie Universität Berlin has shown that a certain class of such problems can actually be solved better and much faster using quantum computers than with conventional methods.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.03.2024
Newly discovered receptor influences gut development in fruit flies
Newly discovered receptor influences gut development in fruit flies
Adhesion GPCRs are a group of G protein-coupled receptors associated with many bodily functions and diseases in humans. Scientists at Leipzig University have discovered a new receptor - which they have named "mayo" - and found that it influences the development of the small intestine and heart function in fruit flies, and that these phenomena may also be relevant in humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.03.2024
Same Target, Different Effects
Same Target, Different Effects
Even if they attack the same target in the bacterial cell, the cellular response to different antibiotics can vary. There is an urgent need for new antimicrobial strategies to keep pathogens in check. This applies specifically to Gram-negative bacteria, which are protected from antibiotic intervention by a thick second membrane.

Social Sciences - 15.03.2024
Do school grades influence parental support?
The Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock, Germany, has researched parents' support behavior in relation to school grades. The study shows that low-income families support their children equally regardless of grades, while parents from higher income groups tend to give more support to children with lower grades.

Environment - 14.03.2024
Plant identification via app enables phenological monitoring
Plant identification via app enables phenological monitoring
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena and the TU Ilmenau have shown that plant observations collected using plant identification apps such as Flora Incognita can provide information about the developmental stages of plants - both on a small scale and across Europe. "The snowdrops have never bloomed as early as this year, have they?" Many people who walk through nature with their eyes open are sure to have asked themselves these or similar questions.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.03.2024
Interaction between metabolic health and healthy aging supported
Ribosomes, the "translation factories" of the cell, are cellular organelles that play a central role in protein synthesis, a vital process for all living organisms. These tiny structures themselves consist of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proteins and are essential for the survival and normal functioning of the cell, as the proteins they produce are required for nearly all cellular processes, including structure, function, and regulation.