news 2014

Astronomy - Aug 10
Astronomy
Until a million years ago, dwarf planet Ceres, the largest body in the asteroid belt, was the scene of cryovolcanic eruptions: below the Occator Crater, subsurface brine pushed upward; the water evaporated, leaving behind bright, salty deposits. This process is probably still ongoing. A team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany comes to these conclusions after evaluating high-resolution camera images of Ceres from the final phase of NASA's Dawn mission.
Life Sciences - Aug 7

How growth rates influence the fitness of bacteria - Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered, as studies by a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) on E. coli bacteria show.

Environment - Aug 4
Environment

Declines in the diversity and abundance of decomposers explain reductions in plant decay rates under the influence of chemical stressors, but not added nutrients.

Materials Science - Aug 5
Materials Science

Longer ranges for electric vehicles and the effective storage of electricity from renewable energies - these are research topics for the future which PhD students in Münster will be working on in a new international Graduate School.

Environment - Aug 4
Environment

Soils harbour a substantial part of the world's biodiversity, yet data on the patterns and processes taking place below ground does not represent all relevant ecosystems and taxa.


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Life Sciences - Health - 09.12.2014
Invasion to the inside
In order to multiply, influenza viruses are dependent on cells of a human or animal body. They board those cells, for example all along the lung surface, and their genetic material migrates into the nucleus, where it is replicated. As a result, new viruses come to life. A team led by scientists from the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence (CiM), University of Münster, has now, for the first time, succeeded in visualizing structures of the viral genome inside of human cells by light microscopy.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 03.04.2014
Schleimige Computer: Künstlerisch-wissenschaftliche Studie zu Schleimpilz-Forschung
Der Computer der Zukunft könnte um einiges schleimiger sein als die Silizium-Geräte, mit denen wir es heutzutage zu tun haben. Genau damit befasst sich die Studie, die Theresa Schubert (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Professur Gestaltung medialer Umgebungen) und Andrew Adamatzky (University of the West of England, Bristol) in dem renommierten Journal 'Materials Today' veröffentlicht haben.

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