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News from the Lab (news.myScience.ch)

  • News from the Lab’ is a selection of scientific works that are significant or interesting for a broad readership. 
  • The selection of news is made by the team of myScience.ch. There is no right to be published or automatic publishing.
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Results 301 - 320 of 337.
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Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 28.04.2022
Graveyard of Earth’s Plates: Ancient Protocrust of Earth Discovered in Depths of Earth’s Mantle
Earth's earliest crust, more than four billion years old, survived deep in the mantle / Traces of ancient Earth's crust still exist today in volcanic rocks at Earth's surface / Publication in PNAS Dr. Jonas Tusch and Carsten Münker, both scientists at the Institute of Geology and Mineralogy at the University of Cologne, along with their colleague Dr. Elis Hoffmann, Freie Universität Berlin, used chemical analyses of magmatic rocks to prove that the remains of the first crust of our planet lie buried at great depths in Earth's mantle.

Environment - History / Archeology - 26.04.2022
Neanderthals of the North
Neanderthals of the North
A multidisciplinary research team from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, the Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, the Leuphana University Lüneburg, the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geophysics and other partner institutions investigated whether Neanderthals were well adapted to life in the cold or preferred more temperate environmental conditions.

Health - Pharmacology - 26.04.2022
Liver fibrosis: the fatal signalling pathway
MHH research team clarifies how liver inflammation and scarring of liver tissue are connected At least five million people in Germany suffer from liver disease. Fibrosis, the pathological proliferation of connective tissue, plays an important role in many complications of chronic liver problems. Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are massively involved in this tissue remodelling.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 26.04.2022
Meat substitutes: Environment does not motivate consumption
Meat substitutes: Environment does not motivate consumption
Animal welfare and health aspects, on the other hand, promote the use of meat alternatives People who have a critical attitude toward factory farming or who pay attention to their health in everyday life are more likely to turn to meat substitutes. Concern for the environment, on the other hand, plays no role in this decision.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.04.2022
Rapid diagnosis instead of a long odyssey
MHH Human Genetics: Whole-genome sequencing to bring the cause of rare diseases in critically ill children to light at an early stage About four million people in Germany suffer from one of the many different rare diseases (SE) - especially seriously ill children who require intensive medical treatment.

Environment - Life Sciences - 25.04.2022
When male bees don't get lucky
When male bees don’t get lucky
04/25/2022 Do pesticides have anything to do with the decline in bee populations? A research team led by the University of Würzburg has investigated - and found a connection between fenbuconazole and the insects' mating behavior. Bees are among the most important pollinators on earth. They pollinate not only plants with beautiful flowers, but also many crops.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.04.2022
A Low-Calorie Diet Alters the Gut Microbiome and Delays Immune Aging
A Low-Calorie Diet Alters the Gut Microbiome and Delays Immune Aging
Around 2 billion people worldwide are overweight. Obesity increases the risk of developing high blood pressure, heart attack or type 2 diabetes mellitus and can cause inflammation in the body that weakens the immune system through an accumulation of specific memory T and B cells. This process is called immune senescence, an age-related change in the immune system.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 22.04.2022
How equal charges in enzymes control biochemical reactions
How equal charges in enzymes control biochemical reactions
Research team led by Göttingen University describes fundamental principle of enzyme catalysis It is well known in physics and chemistry that equal charges repel each other, while opposite charges attract. It was long assumed that this principle also applies when enzymes - the biological catalysts in all living organisms - form or break chemical bonds.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.04.2022
New discoveries about the origin of the brain’s immune system
Important immune cells in the brain's blood vessels do not mature until after birth What gets into the brain and what doesn't is strictly regulated. Researchers at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Freiburg have now studied phagocytes that coat the blood vessels in the brain and reinforce the blood-brain barrier.

Physics - Chemistry - 21.04.2022
Atomic terahertz vibrations generate soliton molecules
Atomic terahertz vibrations generate soliton molecules
Stable packets of light waves - called optical solitons - are emitted in ultrashort-pulse lasers as a chain of light flashes. These solitons often combine into pairs with very short temporal separation. Introducing atomic vibrations in the terahertz range, researchers at the Universities of Bayreuth and Wroclaw have now solved the puzzle of how these temporal links are formed.

Health - Psychology - 21.04.2022
Protection and Risk: Social Cohesion during Lockdown
The CovSocial Project Analyzes the Mental Health and Social Cohesion of the Citizens of Berlin during the COVID-19 Pandemic In the CovSocial project, scholars and scientists led by Tania Singer from the Social Neuroscience Research Group of the Max Planck Society are investigating how the Covid-19 pandemic has affected the mental health and social cohesion of Berlin citizens during the pandemic years 2020 to 2022.

Physics - Microtechnics - 21.04.2022
Microdrones With Light-driven Nanomotors
Microdrones With Light-driven Nanomotors
04/21/2022 Propelling micrometre-sized drones using light only and exerting precise control: Physicists at the University of Würzburg have succeeded at this for the first time. Their microdrones are significantly smaller than red blood cells. A hand-held laser pointer produces no noticeable recoil forces when it is "fired" - even though it emits a directed stream of light particles.

Life Sciences - 20.04.2022
The internal compass: a modular map in the brain
The internal compass: a modular map in the brain
Landmarks like a church steeple or a yellow house on the corner play an important role in the ability to navigate. But so does an internal compass, thought to be supported by specialized neurons in the brain - called -head-direction- cells. These neurons respond to direction, and there are still many unsolved puzzles as to how they work.

Computer Science - Earth Sciences - 20.04.2022
Artificial Intelligence Decodes Causes of Mass Extinction in the Permian
Artificial Intelligence Decodes Causes of Mass Extinction in the Permian
Volcanic eruptions in Siberia caused massive climate change 252 million years ago. Approximately 75 percent of all land organisms and 90 percent of all ocean organisms perished. The paleontologist Dr. William Foster at the Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN) has now decoded the causes of this mass extinction in the oceans.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 20.04.2022
Bumblebees' nutrition influences their pesticide resistance
Bumblebees’ nutrition influences their pesticide resistance
Effects of a common fungicide differ depending on the plant to which it is applied How susceptible bumblebees are to a common fungicide depends on the flowering plants to which it is applied on and how diverse the food supply is that is available to the insects. Monocultures can increase the insects' sensitivity to the fungicide or generally have negative effects on health, growth and fertility.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.04.2022
Flying into a clean and safe future
Flying into a clean and safe future
In the race to avoid runaway climate change, two renewable energy technologies are being pushed as the solution to powering human societies: wind and solar. But for many years, wind turbines have been on a collision course with wildlife conservation. Birds and other flying animals risk death by impact with the rotor blades of turbines, raising questions about the feasibility of wind as a cornerstone of a global clean energy policy.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.04.2022
Enzyme prevents brain activity from getting out of control
Mechanism identified at University of Bonn alters the coupling of nerve cells The brain has the ability to modify the contacts between neurons. Among other things, that is how it prevents brain activity from getting out of control. Researchers from the University Hospital Bonn, together with a team from Australia, have identified a mechanism that plays an important role in this.

Innovation - Materials Science - 19.04.2022
New process enables 3D printing of small and complex components made of glass in just a few minutes
New process enables 3D printing of small and complex components made of glass in just a few minutes
Scientists combine materials science invention with newly developed 3D printing technology Because of its outstanding transparency as well as its stability in contact with heat or chemicals, glass is relevant for many high-tech applications. However, conventional processes for shaping glass are often tedious, energy-intensive and quickly reach their limits for small and complicated components.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.04.2022
New approach against chronic inflammation
New approach against chronic inflammation
Researchers at the University of Bonn are treating mice with so-called "nanobodies" Researchers at the Universities of Bonn and Sao Paulo have succeeded in mitigating chronic inflammation in mice using customized "mini-antibodies." These nanobodies enabled them to dissolve molecular complexes in tissue that normally activate the immune system.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 19.04.2022
No glacial fertilization effect in the Antarctic Ocean
No glacial fertilization effect in the Antarctic Ocean
International study led by the University of Bonn records 1.5 million years of climate in the drill core Can iron-rich dust fertilize the ocean, stimulate algae growth there, and thereby capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere? An international research team led by the University of Bonn used deep-sea sediment cores from the Scotia Sea to investigate whether this hypothetical greenhouse gas sink had an effect during ice ages.
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